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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
have key partners in that area that we've worked with in yuge and rwanda as we've dealt with swigses in africa and the instability coming out of the drc is a threat to all of that. we have seen in recent months that africa is increasingly important in our national security interests. the instability there is giving rise to many al qaeda inspired insurgencies and that instability threatens our securities. and one of the biggest purposes is to get a greater feel for what the department of defense can do in that roibling to help. the big -- region can do to help. the biggest problem is a lack of governance, lack of rule of law and just a rogue gallery of war lords, revolutionaries and violent groups of individuals that have taken advantage of that ungoverned space. and created no end of problems. so building towards greater stability and security in that region has to be our focus. i know the d.o.d. has done some work in that region. we're currently working with the ugenden army in dealing with the lord's resistance army one that has helped to destabilize the drc but we have also in the
genocide in rwanda. they raped hundreds of women, chopping apart michildren, massacre of people. that's who the government is teaming up with. congo is really this -- it's like this caldron of abuse on a scale that's unlike just about anywhere else in the world. i cover a number of these conflicts in africa. just about everywhere else things are changing or getting a bit better in some cases. congo has stayed the same for almost ten years and that same is very disturbing state of anarchy. >> congo has enormous resources and the a beautiful lush country. >> it's spectacular. it's one of the most beautiful places i've been ever where. there was a huge volcano with streams of smoke shooting out of it. it's very lush. it's very fertile. the lakes are beautiful. the environment is clean. it's blessed with mineral riches, gold, timber, copper. just about everything. that's part of the reason why we're seeing this fight. the u.s. government has tried to get their hands around this by passing this resource conflict legislation that tries to get their arms around better regulating the minerals that
. president clinton had said allowing genocide to happen in rwanda was one of his greatest failures in office. we know the president spent time with bill clinton recently. what is your sense how potent this is for president obama and whether or not he would take the step of taking out these facilities before this could happen? >> well i think we obviously known about the threat of syria's chemical weapons capability for a long time and this conflict has been going on now, getting close to two years. so we're a little bit late in the game to finally be worried about what might happen. in fact, there is actually a bigger risk in my view. it will be a tragedy if the weapons are used against the opposition in syria. but the potential for an even larger tragedy exists if the opposition gets hold of these chemical weapons, the terrorist elements in the opposition and sends them outside syria where they could be used by terrorists around the world. so the threat, although our immediate focus is the risk inside syria, i don't think we can ignore. i think america's focus ought to be the threat expandi
of the most beautiful modern housing communities in the world. it's a massive city. it's outside of rwanda, angola. the government had to build this to solve its housing shortage, but very few can actually afford to live there. cnn's dave mckenzie takes us inside a high-rise ghosttown. ♪ >> this is the promise of a new angola. the government propaganda video shows the scale of the new city. ♪ the chinese got. it's quite extraordinary. some five years ago there was absolutely nothing here. just bush. in that time they have schools and medical centers, kindergartens and tens of thousands of apartments. built using angola's oil credit lines with china. the final touches are still being made. but there are highways without cars. schools with no pupils. it feels like a ghosttown. we eventually found someone who had bought a flat. >> so you live in this apartment building? which -- where is your apartment? on the seventh floor. wow. and this building, is it completely filled? >> no, no. >> translator: no. we have through residents in this building. three apartments occupied. >> reporter: is
anything as far as rwanda and the generocide that goes on. >> he blames himself. >> he knew what was going on. he made that decision not to intervene and 800,000 or so people were slaughtered as a result of that. i went with him to those countries in 1998. susan rice was with me on that trip as well as assistant secretary for african affairs. he blames himself. >> to retroactively turn that on susan rice is ridiculous. >> that's a former situation that obviously the former president of the united states knows very, very well. piers morgan will have the full interview tonight at 9:00 p.m. eastern. i think you're going to want to watch this important interview. piers is going to join us in our 6:00 p.m. eastern hour as well. >>> both egyptians that despise the government are venting on the streets. like a lot of things, trying to find a better job can be frustrating. so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we lea
into question and she was in the national security council back in 1993 when rwanda kicked off and she made a controversial comment about, well, if we call it a genocide and don't act. what will be the implications on the november mid term election? and if you hook at-- and then later on, reflexively supported the regime in ruwan da when there were more war crimes committed and since vowed to heal that, but, you know, you've seen her political statements recently that showed there's a political side of susan rice and willingness for talking points that we can't afford as secretary of state and john kerry, he was part of the foreign senate relations committee and he was back in the late 60's and talked about war crimes that he reportedly saw against the vietnam war and you have some track records that don't make them the best fit. >> there are numerous republicans, john mccain, lindsey graham, a barraso who sates i would support john kerry as secretary of state who in their words would cruise through a nomination. and how would an affect if those two are in place? >> if you like what's in th
happening. after what has happened in rwanda in the 1990's, and in bosnia, the international community came up with an excellent idea after that, in establishing the international criminal court in july of 2002. after that, the responsibility is to protect in 2005. after that, the international community will understand that if a state cannot commit crimes against its own people. should the international community -- the syrian case officially approve that all of this discussion and all of that was untrue. we have been seeing crimes against humanity. we have been seeing war crimes committed by the regime, day-by- day. children, women -- we see all the time torture. children are being tortured. we have been seeing cases of rape in different areas. we have seen a systematic and widespread policy of targeting organization figures and leaders. these are crimes against amenity. -- humanity. despite all of that, we have five special sessions of the u.n. human rights council in geneva. they come up with strong resolutions that what is happening in syria are crimes against humanity. they establish
hurdle on the coleco rwanda would lead them to fight even if they lose damascus and as they put additional pressures on the unity of the syrian state and we certainly do not want to see the syrian state disintegrate. it goes back into this question of how to convince the community that it has a role in the future of syria like others in their doesn't have to be a genocide. i was struck by the editorial or an opinion piece in "the new york times" i think at the beginning of last week for the week before about the next genocide being against allowites, and that fear is present among the community members and so what you are talking about is just an extension of that and the way around it is the political solution the longer the violence goes on, the more extremist groups benefit and based on what we have seen of no sort of parent organization, al qaeda and iraqi will not be merciful at all so it is incumbent on us to bolster what in the political opposition which is what we are trying to do. >> thank you, ambassador woo-hoo when you say the regime is numbered is that proverbial or
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)